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June Bugs Infest Charlottesville in July

By: Marcus Washington
By: Marcus Washington

July 13, 2005

It's not just the hot weather that indicates summer is here.
Another tell-tale sign is the hum of the June Bug.

"Certain hours at night, a lot of the June bugs just swarm around the stairwell," said Jeff Divietro, annoyed by June Bugs. "I guess you just have to walk through them and step on a bunch of them to get your door."

These days stepping on bugs is something quite a few people in Charlottesville are getting use to. In some places you could say that it looks like 'The Attack of the June Bug.'

"It's a little annoying, but only for a few seconds. It doesn't really bother me too much," said Divietro.

Some people aren't bothered by this beetle, but try having one attached to you. Oumar Ganame's first hand experience with the bug wasn't so friendly.

"I kind of caught it on my neck," said Ganame. "I've definitely seen a couple. [They're] just everywhere. I don't even know where they come from, but they're all over the place."

Where they come from isn't a mystery. Entomologist explain that recent weather could be the cause of why so many June Bugs are seen in the middle of July.

"Since we had such an extended period of dry weather in June and a sudden heavy rain fall event in the last couple of weeks that's probably one explanation for why a lot of these beetles cam out at the same time," said Dr. Chris Asaro, Entomologist.

If you're worried about the overwhelming number you may have seen, you shouldn't. The only threat the June Bug poses is being a nuisance.

"They can be pests of your garden and your lawn and pasture areas and things like that, but they can be controlled by insecticides," explained Dr. Asaro.

If you don't have time to get someone to spray your lawn or garden, the bug only lives about a year. To that, Dr. Asaro said, "you just have to live with it."

You may have to live with even a few more. One female June Bug will lay between 50 and 200 eggs each year. They normally lay their eggs in most soil and that could cause damage to many lawns.


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