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Dismantlng Jim Crow: 1954-1974

Date(s): 5/13/2014

6pm

Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, 233 4th St NW Charlottesville, VA 22903
2014 is a significant year as it marks the anniversaries of three important events in America's history--the settling of the landmark court case Brown vs. Board of Education, the passing of the Civil Rights Act, and the advent of the Boston busing riots. Over the course of three days we will look at these events through three films and a conversation with Mildred W. Robinson, Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, about her book Law Touched Our Hearts: A Generation Remembers Brown v. Board of Education.
Can We Talk? Learning from Boston’s Busing/Desegregation
Crisis (2012) 56 min
The Boston busing crisis (1974–1988) was a series of protests and riots that occurred in Boston, Massachusetts in response to the passing of the 1965 Racial Imbalance Act, which ordered public schools in the state to desegregate. The legislation provoked outrage from white Bostonians and led to widespread protests and violent public disturbances. The conflict lasted for over a decade and contributed to a demographic shift in Boston public schools, with dramatically fewer students enrolling in public schools and more white families sending their children to private schools instead. Can We Talk? was produced, written and directed by media producer Scott Mercer and filmed by Justin Shannahan. The film offers powerful stories of the 1970’s busing/desegregation crisis that changed Boston forever. Most of those in the film have never publicly shared their stories.
Suggested donation $5.00

May 13, 7:00 pm
Discussion with Mildred W. Robinson, Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law, University of Virginia
Mildred Robinson’s book Law Touched Our Hearts: A Generation Remembers Brown v. Board of Education stands alone in presenting, in one source, stories of black and white Americans, men and women, from all parts of the nation, who were public school students during the years immediately after Brown vs. Board of Education. All shared an epiphany. Some became aware of race and the burden of racial separation. Others dared to hope that the yoke of racial oppression would at last be lifted. Robinson and her co-editors surveyed 4750 law professors born between 1936 and 1954, received 1000 responses, and derived forty essays from those willing to write personal accounts of their childhood experiences in the classroom and in their communities. Their moving stories of how Brown affected them say much about race relations then and now. They also provide a picture of how social change can shape the careers of an entire generation in one profession.
434 260-8720, admin@jeffschoolheritagecenter.org

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